Encyclopedia of mtDNA Origins

  • J1c5c

    Haplogroup J1c5c is a branch on the maternal tree of human kind. Its age is between 1,500 and 8,900 years (Behar et al., 2012b). Its exact origin is not yet clear but is likely in the Middle East.

    People: Muslims Places: India and Saudi Arabia

     

Explore your maternal heritage in the Encyclopedia of mtDNA Origins.

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Genetic Genealogy News

Student Citizen-Science: Connecting the Jewish Future to Its Past

The Y-DNA Q-M242 Project will be partnering with Avotaynu in 2017 on several research initiatives to expand our knowledge of Jewish Heritage, Genealogy, and the branches of Haplogroup Q found in Jewish Diaspora populations.

Holiday Sale at Family Tree DNA

Family Tree DNA has announced their Holiday Sale. The message is clear. Every Monday customers will get coupons. If you like your coupon, use it. If you don't, get someone else to use it, and [...]

Exploring Microarray Chips

I am starting my first big adventure for the Genetic Genealogy Compendium. Four major genetic genealogy test sellers use microarray chips (Genotyping BeadChips) for products: Ancestry.com, 23andMe, Family Tree DNA, and the National Geographic Genographic Project.

The Encyclopedia of mtDNA Origins – Initial launch

This morning, I am pushing the Encyclopedia of mtDNA Origins out into the world. Each of the requirements for it is complete. What remains is doing quality assurance work and flushing out the basic background text.

Recent Journal Articles

Whole-genome view of the consequences of a population bottleneck using 2926 genome sequences from Finland and United Kingdom

As a model of an isolate population, we sequenced the genomes of 1463 Finnish individuals as part of the Sequencing Initiative Suomi (SISu) Project.

Reconstructing the population history of the largest tribe of India: the Dravidian speaking Gond

To gain a more comprehensive view on ancient ancestry and genetic affinities of the Gond with the neighbouring populations speaking Indo-European, Dravidian and Austroasiatic languages, we have studied four geographically distinct groups of Gond using high-resolution data.

A fast and accurate method for detection of IBD shared haplotypes in genome-wide SNP data

We developed a new IBD segment detection program, FISHR (Find IBD Shared Haplotypes Rapidly), in an attempt to accurately detect IBD segments and to better estimate their endpoints using an algorithm that is fast enough to be deployed on very large whole-genome SNP data sets.

Psychological and behavioural impact of returning personal results from whole-genome sequencing: the HealthSeq project

We conducted an exploratory longitudinal cohort study in which quantitative surveys and in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted before and after personal results were returned to individuals who underwent whole-genome sequencing.

Latest Posts

The Q-Y2200 Tree & the Q-L245 SNP Pack

They talk about not being able to see the forest for the trees. For Q-Y2200, this is not our problem. We have found many of the Jewish Q trees in the forest, and we know that Q-Y2200 is one tree. The problem is that we cannot puzzle out the trees and their branches by looking at the leaves.

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Q-M242 Project News (22 Dec 2016)

The big news for the project today is that we have successfully funded three BIG Ys for the project. These include a Mahican Q-M3, a New Mexico Jewish Heritage Q-L275, and an Italian Q-L245. We are now working to fund testing of an Asian Q-M120 project member.

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Nearing the End of the FTDNA Holiday Sale and BIG Y SALE Prices

Family Tree DNA's Holiday sale ends at midnight on December 31st. If you plan to order the BIG Y for one of your kits, please check with me for help finding a $75 off coupon.

Mahican BIG Y Testing

The project has the opportunity to BIG Y test the descendant of Toanunck who was a Mahican from the Egremont, Berkshire County, Massachusetts area before he moved to what is now West Virginia and changed his name to Jacob Van Gilder. To do this during the current SALE at Family Tree DNA would cost the project $450.