Demographic history of Canary Islands male gene-pool: replacement of native lineages by European

Demographic history of Canary Islands male gene-pool: replacement of native lineages by European

Abstract:

The origin and prevalence of the prehispanic settlers of the Canary Islands has attracted great multidisciplinary interest. However, direct ancient DNA genetic studies on indigenous and historical 17th-18th century remains, using mitochondrial DNA as a female marker, have only recently been possible. In the present work, the analysis of Y-chromosome polymorphisms in the same samples, has shed light on the way the European colonization affected male and female Canary Island indigenous genetic pools, from the conquest to present-day times.RESULTS:Autochthonous (E-M81) and prominent (E-M78 and J-M267) Berber Y-chromosome lineages were detected in the indigenous remains, confirming a North West African origin for their ancestors which confirms previous mitochondrial DNA results. However, in contrast with their female lineages, which have survived in the present-day population since the conquest with only a moderate decline, the male indigenous lineages have dropped constantly being substituted by European lineages. Male and female sub-Saharan African genetic inputs were also detected in the Canary population, but their frequencies were higher during the 17th-18th centuries than today.CONCLUSION:The European colonization of the Canary Islands introduced a strong sex-biased change in the indigenous population in such a way that indigenous female lineages survived in the extant population in a significantly higher proportion than their male counterparts.

Citation:

  • Fregel, Rosa; Gomes, Veronica; Gusmao, Leonor; Gonzalez, Ana; Cabrera, Vicente; Amorim, Antonio & Larruga, Jose (2009). Demographic history of Canary Islands male gene-pool: replacement of native lineages by European. BMC Evolutionary Biology, 9(1), 181+.

Source Link:
http://www.dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2148-9-181

Keywords

Peoples: - | Places: Europe | Topics: - | DNA Type: Y-DNA

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