Ireland – A Place

Summary

  • Politics
    • Name: Ireland
    • Capital: Dublin
    • 2 Letter Code: IE
    • 3 Letter Code: IRL
  • Land
    • Contenent: Europe
    • Region: Northern Europe
    • Total Land: 70,273 (27,133)
    • Land: 68,883 (26,596)
    • Water: 1,390 (540)
  • People
    • Population: 4,062,235
    • Birth Rate: 14.45 per 1,000
    • Death Rate: 7.82 per 1,000
    • Infant Mortality: 5.39 per 1,000
    • Literacy: 99.00%
  • Economy
    • Agriculture: 5%%
    • Industry: 46%%
    • Service: 49%%

Ireland is also known as the Republic of Ireland. It is an island nation in Northwestern Europe. It lies to the west of Great Britain.

The Republic of Ireland occupies five-sixths of the island of Ireland in the North Atlantic Ocean. On the western coast are tall sea cliffs. They place the land high above the sea. At the top, most of the island is flat with rolling interior plain. The plain is surrounded by rugged hills and low mountains. The island has a temperate maritime climate. It is influenced by the North Atlantic Current. There are mild winters and cool summers. It is consistently humid. The skies are overcast about half the time.

Prehistory

The first people we are sure lived in Ireland were hunter-gathers. The first artifacts from them date to 7900 BCE. From then until about 4000 BCE these were the only people there. Slowly, the farming revolution reached Ireland. We call this the Neolithic revolution. With it came pottery, polished stone tools, rectangular wooden houses, megalithic tombs, and domesticated sheep and cattle. Farming helped the population of Ireland grow. By the end of the Neolithic period, new building forms were emerging.

The Neolithic in Ireland was followed by the Bronze age. This started around 2000 BCE in Ireland. Here, the Bronze age was marked by use of gold and bronze. They were used for ornaments, weapons, and tools.

By 600 BCE, the Bronze age in Ireland transformed to the Iron age. The Iron age saw the first Celtic-speaking people reach Ireland. They came between 600 and 150 BCE.

The Roman empire never conquered Ireland as they did what is now England. We know from them though something of these early Iron age people. Though there are oral traditions, these are the earliest written accounts .

History

In the 8th century (900 CE) Norsemen from the northern lands of Europe began to raid and settle Ireland. These invasions ended two hundred years later. They were stopped when King Brian Boru defeated the Danes. This happened in 1014.

Ireland had a period of relative peace. This was broken by the invasions of Normans from France in the 12th century. Thus began over seven hundred years of struggle between the Irish and the invaders. For the Normans were in time replaced by the English as foes.

The ongoing struggle was marked by uprisings and repressions.

Meanwhile, the introduction of the potato from the Americas as a crop helped cause a population boom. This boom was harshly cut in the mid-19th century. A blight attacked the potato crops year after year. There was little to eat. Many people starved to death. Between death and emigration, the population of Ireland shrank by over 25%.

This is the history that has shaped the Republic of Ireland.

Modern Times

The population of modern Ireland is now over five million. There are two official languages in Ireland. They are English and Irish (Gaelic or Gaeilge). 

The majority of the population 82.2% is native born Irish. Another 0.7% are Irish travelers 0.7%. There are also people from other European countries (9.5%).  Other ethnic groups include Asians (2.1%) and Africans (1.4%).

The historic Roman Catholic church continues to dominate religion. Roman Catholics are 78.3% of the population. Other Christian denominations include the Church of Ireland (2.7%) and the Orthodox church (1.3%). There is a small Muslim (1.3%) population.

Genetics

The genetics of Ireland has been influenced by each successive wave of migration. To some degree, it is expected to show the traces of first farmers, Bronze Age Celtic migrants, Norse invaders, Norman conquer, and English and Scottish overlords. Yet, as an island population endogamy and its way of shaping local genetics is also expected. That is, in most generations the average person married someone from their own small village or market town.

mtDNA

Mitochondrial DNA follows direct maternal lines. In telling the story of a people, its strength lies in tracing this single line. There are thirteen major maternal lineages in Ireland. They are H (42.5%), HV (1.5%), I (3.0%), J (10.0%), K (10.4%), M (0.1%), N (0.1%), T (9.1%), U (15.0%), V (4.6%), W (2.1%), X (1.3%), and Y (0.1%). [wpdatachart id=1]

Literature and Data Review

Genographic Data

mtDNA

Genographic ProjectGeno 2.0 Data

Data from Geno 2.0 is derived from the The National Geographic Society’s Genographic Project — the DAR. The Hg ID is specific to this site and is used to protect the identities of those who take part in Genographic research. Birth Country, Mother's Birth Country, and Maternal Grandmother's Birth Country have been normalized from DAR database fields. The Maternal Origin is determined based on the three previous fields.

Note: Geno 2.0 results currently use Phylotree build 16. I am working on changing results over to build 17.

Hg ID Hg Build 16 Birth Country Mother's Birth Country Maternal Grandmother's Birth Country
Hap10005488 HV16 United States United States Ireland
Hap10005550 H2a1 United States Ireland Ireland
Hap10005650 H7 United States United States Ireland
Hap10005983 H3g New Zealand New Zealand Ireland
Hap10006197 H1bb Australia Ireland Ireland
Hap10006240 H2a1a1 United States United States Ireland
Hap10006338 H1ag1 United States United States Ireland
Hap10006357 H6a1b2 United States United States Ireland
Hap10006367 H1a United Kingdom Ireland Ireland
Hap10006704 H3a1 United Kingdom Ireland Ireland
Hap10006775 H1ba United States Ireland Ireland
Hap10006781 H1 United States United States Ireland
Hap10006816 H1c1a Canada Canada Ireland
Hap10006897 H11a2a1 Ireland Ireland Ireland
Hap10006925 H4a1a2a1 Ireland Ireland Unspecified
Hap10007064 HV0 United States United States Ireland
Hap10007341 H1bb United States United States Ireland
Hap10007765 H14b United States United States Ireland
Hap10007791 H13a1a1a Canada Canada Ireland
Hap10007894 H8c2 United States United States Ireland
Hap10007901 H13a1a Canada Ireland Ireland
Hap10007944 H6a1b2 United States Ireland Unspecified
Hap10007954 H1c1 Ireland Ireland Ireland
Hap10008414 H3v1 United States United States Ireland
Hap10008486 H1e2 United States Ireland Ireland
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Sources and Resources

Background

Journal Articles

  • Rosser, Z.; Zerjal, T.; Hurles, M.; Adojaan, M.; Alavantic, D.; Amorim, A.; Amos, W.; Armenteros, M.; Arroyo, E. & Barbujani, G. (2000). Y-Chromosomal Diversity in Europe Is Clinal and Influenced Primarily by Geography, Rather than by Language. American journal of human genetics, 67(6), 1526-1543.
  • Capelli, C., Redhead, N., Abernethy, J.K., Gratrix, F., Wilson, J.F., Moen, T., Hervig, T., Richards, M., Stumpf, M.P., Underhill, P.A. and Bradshaw, P. (2003). A Y Chromosome Census of the British Isles. Current Biology, 13(11), 979-984.

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