///Use GEDMatch ‘One-to-many’ matches

Use GEDMatch ‘One-to-many’ matches

The GEDMatch ‘One-to-many' matches page shows who you match in the GEDMatch database and the amount of autosomal DNA and X-chromosome DNA you share with them.

Before starting this tutorial, you should have set up your GEDMatch account.

Step 1

Go to the GEDMatch website. Login to your account by entering your email and password and by clicking the Log in button.

GEDMatch Login

GEDMatch Login

Step 2

From the GEDMatch dashboard, click the ‘One-to-many' matches link in the Analyze Your Data area.

Step 3

The next page is settings for the One-to-many comparison. I strongly suggest changing the threshold of the largest segment from 7 to 10 (15 if you are Ashkenazi Jewish or another endogamous population).

GEDMATCH: One to Many Matching Settings

Matching Settings

Step 4

The top of the One-to-many comparison page has information on advanced features that will be covered in a future tutorial.

Top of the GEDMatch One to Many Comparison Page

One-to-many Comparison Page

Step 5

The matching table is below. Matches are presorted to show those with the highest number of total centiMorgans (cM) first.

GEDMatch One to Many Comparison Results Table Heading

Results Table Headings

Step 6

Below I will explain what each column does and how it is useful.

GEDMatch One to Many Comparison (Numbered Headings)

Numbered Headings

  1. Kit Nbr – This is the kit or ID number assigned by GEDMatch when the match uploaded their data file.
  2. Type – This is the version of microarray chip that the match. For example, V4 is the 23andMe V4 chip.
  3. List – This is a shortcut link to view a list of people who the match matches.
  4. Select – This is a check box that lets you select one or more matches to use for advanced options. I will explain these options in a future tutorial.
  5. Sex – The genetic sex of the match.
  6. GED/WikiTree – These are links to each match's tree on GEDMatch and WikiTree respectively. This tutorial explains how you and matches can upload a tree to GEDMatch. I will cover uploading a tree to WikiTree and linking it to GEDMatch in a future tutorial.
  7. Mt – This is the mtDNA (mitochondrial DNA) haplogroup of the match. If you know your mtDNA haplogroup, it can help you tell if the match is on your direct maternal line.
  8. Y – This is the Y-DNA (Y-chromosome DNA) haplogroup of the match. If you are male and know your Y-DNA haplogroup, it can help you tell if the match is one your direct paternal line.
  9. Autosomal Details – This is the link to the One-to-one autosomal DNA tool for you and your match. I will cover, how to use this tool in an upcoming tutorial.
  10. Autosomal Total cM – This is the total number of Autosomal DNA centiMorgans (cM) shared between you and a match. The higher the number, the more recent your relationship likely is..
  11. Autosomal Largest cM – This is the size of the largest autosomal DNA Segment shared between you and your match. Generally the larger the DNA segment the more recent the relationship. However, you should use this generalization with care as it is possible to share a relatively large segment with a more distant relative.
  12. Autosomal Gen – This is the number of generations between you and each match predicted by GEDMatch. Because their predictions are not calibrated against a large number of known relationships, I suggest using another way to find the likely relationship like the DNA Statistics chart at DNA Detectives.
  13. X-chromosome Details – This is the link to the One-to-one X-chromosome DNA tool for you and your match. I will cover how to use this tool in an upcoming tutorial.
  14. X-chromosome Total cM – This is the total number of X-chromosome DNA centiMorgans (cM) shared between you and a match. The higher the number, the more recent your relationship likely is.
  15. X-chromosome Largest cM – This is the size of the largest X-chromosome DNA Segment shared between you and your match. Generally the larger the DNA segment the more recent the relationship. However, you should use this generalization with care as it is possible to share a relatively large segment with a more distant relative.
  16. Name (*=> alias) – This is either the name of your match or their alias.
  17. Email – This is the email address of the person managing the account of your match.

The next tutorial will explain how to use the autosomal DNA One-to-one compare tool to evaluate a match found on the One-to-many matches page.

2017-10-01T05:47:39+00:00 September 23rd, 2017|Categories: HOWTOs|Tags: , |