//Russian Journal of Genetics

Ads and affiliate links like this help support the Q-M242 project's efforts to test indigenous peoples. Please read the affiliateship and business disclaimers for details. You may also donate directly here.

Russian Journal of Genetics

Publisher:
Impact Factor:
Years in Print:
Journal Website:

Articles of Interest

Is there a Finno-Ugric component in the gene pool of Russians from Yaroslavl oblast? Evidence from Y-chromosome

Journal: Russian Journal of Genetics | Year: 2017

Abstract:

The Upper Volga region was an area of contacts of Finno-Ugric, Slavic, and Scandinavian speaking populations in the 8th–10th centuries AD. However, their role in the formation of the contemporary gene pool of the Russian population of the region is largely unknown. To answer this question, we studied four populations of Yaroslavl oblast (N = 132) by a wide panel of STR and SNP markers of the Y-chromosome. Two of the studied populations appear to be genetically similar: the indigenous Russian population of Yaroslavl oblast and population of Katskari are characterized by the same major haplogroup, R-M198 (xM458). Haplogroup R-M458 composes more than half of Sitskari’s gene pool. The major haplogroup in the gene pool of the population of the ancient town of Mologa is N-M178. Subtyping N-M178 by newest “genomeera” Y-SNP markers showed different pathways of entering this haplogroup into the gene pools of Yaroslavl Volga region populations. The majority of Russian populations have subvariant N3a3-CTS10760; the regular sample of Yaroslavl oblast is equally represented by subvariants N3a3-CTS10760 and N3a4-Z1936, while subvariant N3a4-Z1936 predominates in the gene pool of population of Mologa. This N3a4-Z1936 haplogroup is common among the population of the north of Eastern Europe and the Volga-Ural region. The obtained results indicate preservation of the Finno-Ugric component in the gene pool of population of Mologa and a contribution of Slavic colonization in the formation of the gene pool of the Yaroslavl Volga region populations and make it possible to hypothesize the genetic contribution of the “downstream” (Rostov- Suzdal) rather than “upstream” (Novgorod) Slavic migration wave.

Peoples: Finno-Ugric, Scandinavian, and Slavs | Places: Upper Volga region | Topics: | DNA Type: Y-DNA

Mitochondrial DNA Variation in the Kets and Nganasans and Its Implications for the Initial Peopling of Northern Eurasia

Journal: Russian Journal of Genetics | Year: 2002

Abstract:

Peoples: | Places: | Topics: | DNA Type: mtDNA

Gene pool of peoples from the Republic Sakha (Yakutia): Structure, origin, genetic relationships

Journal: Russian Journal of Genetics | Year: 2010

Abstract:

The article presents the results of investigating the gene pool structure and genetic history of the population of the Republic Sakha (Yakutia), using two mutually supplementing genetic systems: mitochondrial DNA and the Y chromosome.

Peoples: - | Places: - | Topics: - | DNA Type: Y-DNA

The genetic history of Russian old settlers of polar northeastern Siberia

Journal: Russian Journal of Genetics | Year: 2010

Abstract:

The mtDNA variation has been studied in representatives of the Russkoe Ust'e (n = 30), Kolyma (n = 31), and Markovo (n = 26) ethnic subgroups originating from Russian military men, hunters, and fishers who married local Yukaghir women and settled at the Arctic Ocean coast and on the Anadyr' River more than 350 years ago. The mtDNA haplotypes characteristic of indigenous Siberian peoples have been demonstrated to form the basis of the mitochondrial gene pool of Russian old settlers of the region. Only one of 30 identified haplotypes belonging to 11 haplogroups (H2a) is characteristic of European populations. The C and D haplogroups are the most diverse. The analysis has revealed the characteristics of the population structure of the Russian old settlers and allowed them to be interpreted in terms of recent historical and environmental processes.

Peoples: | Places: | Topics: | DNA Type:

Comparative characteristics of the gene pool of Teleuts inferred from Y-chromosomal marker data

Journal: Russian Journal of Genetics | Year: 2009

Abstract:

The gene pool structure of Teleuts was examined and Y-chromosomal haplogroups composition and frequencies were determined. In the gene pool of Teleuts, five haplogroups, C3×M77, N3a, R1b*, R1b3, and R1a1, were identified. Evaluation of the genetic differentiation of the samples examined using analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) with two marker systems (frequencies of haplogroups and Y-chromosomal microsatellite haplotypes) showed that Bachat Teleuts were equally distant from Southern and Northern Altaians. In Siberian populations, the frequencies and molecular phylogeny of the YSTR haplotypes within Y-chromosomal haplogroup R1a1 were examined. It was demonstrated that Teleuts and Southern Altaians had very close and overlapping profiles of R1a1 haplotypes. Population cluster analysis of the R1a1 YSTR haplotypes showed that Teleuts and Southern Altaians were closer to one another than to all remaining Siberian ethnic groups. Phylogenetic analysis of N3a haplotypes suggested specificity of Teleut haplotypes and their closeness to those of Tomsk Tatars. Teleuts were characterized by extremely high frequency of haplogroup R1b*, distinguished for highly specific profile of YSTR haplotypes and high haplotype diversity. The results of the comparative analysis suggested that the gene pool of Bachat Teleuts was formed on the basis of at least two heterogeneous genetic components, probably associated with ancient Turkic and Samoyedic ethnic components.

Peoples: - | Places: - | Topics: - | DNA Type: Y-DNA

Distribution of the male lineages of Genghis Khan's descendants in northern Eurasian populations

Journal: Russian Journal of Genetics | Year: 2007

Abstract:

Data on the variation of 12 microsatellite loci of Y-chromosome haplogroup C3 were used to screen lineages included in the cluster of Genghis Khan's descendants in 18 northern Eurasian populations (Altaian Kazakhs, Altaians-Kizhi, Teleuts, Khakassians, Shorians, Tyvans, Todjins, Tofalars, Sojots, Buryats, Khamnigans, Evenks, Mongols, Kalmyks, Tajiks, Kurds, Persians, and Russians; the total sample size was 1437 people). The highest frequency of haplotypes from the cluster of the Genghis Khan's descendants was found in Mongols (34.8%). In Russia, this cluster was found in Altaian Kazakhs (8.3%), Altaians (3.4%), Buryats (2.3%), Tyvans (1.9%), and Kalmyks (1.7%).

Peoples: - | Places: - | Topics: - | DNA Type: Y-DNA

Gene pool differences between Northern and Southern Altaians inferred from the data on Y-chromosomal haplogroups

Journal: Russian Journal of Genetics | Year: 2007

Abstract:

Y-chromosomal haplogroups composition and frequencies were analyzed in Northern and Southern Altaians. In the gene pool of Altaians a total of 18 Y-chromosomal haplogroups were identified, including C3xM77, C3c, DxM15, E, F*, J2, I1a, I1b, K*, N*, N2, N3a, O3, P*, Q*, R1*, R1a1, and R1b3. The structuring nature of the Altaic gene pool is determined by the presence of the Caucasoid and Mongoloid components, along with the ancient genetic substratum, marked by the corresponding Western and Eastern Eurasian haplogroups. Haplogroup R1a1 prevailed in both ethnic groups, accounting for about 53 and 38% of paternal lineages in Southern and Northern Altaians, respectively. This haplogroup is thought to be associated with the eastward expansion of early Indo-Europeans, and marks Caucasoid element in the gene pools of South Siberian populations. Similarly to haplogroup K*, the second frequent haplogroup Q* represents paleo-Asiatic marker, probably associated with the Ket and Samoyedic contributions to the Altaic gene pool. The presence of lineages N2 and N3a can be explained as the contribution of Finno-Ugric tribes, assimilated by ancient Turks. The presence of haplogroups C3xM77, C3c, N*, and O3 reflects the contribution of Central Asian Mongoloid groups. These haplogroups, probably, mark the latest movements of Mongolian migrants from the territory of contemporary Tuva and Mongolia. The data of factor analysis, variance analysis, cluster analysis, and phylogenetic analysis point to substantial genetic differentiation of Northern and Southern Altaians. The differences between Northern and Southern Altaians in the haplogroup composition, as well as in the internal haplotype structure were demonstrated.

Peoples: - | Places: - | Topics: - | DNA Type: Y-DNA

Gene Pool Structure of Eastern Ukrainians as Inferred from the Y-Chromosome Haplogroups

Journal: Russian Journal of Genetics | Year: 2004

Abstract:

Y chromosomes from representative sample of Eastern Ukrainians (94 individuals) were analyzed for composition and frequencies of haplogroups, defined by 11 biallelic loci located in non-recombining part of the chromosome (SRY1532, YAP, 92R7, DYF155S2, 12f2, Tat, M9, M17, M25,M89, andM56). In the Ukrainian gene, pool six haplogroups were revealed: E, F (including G and I), J, N3, P, and R1a1. These haplogroups were earlier detected in a study of Y-chromosome diversity on the territory of Europe as a whole. The major haplogroup in the Ukrainian gene pool, haplogroup R1a1 (earlier designated HG3), accounted for about 44% of all Y chromosomes in the sample examined. This haplogroup is thought to mark the migration patterns of the early Indo-Europeans and is associated with the distribution of the Kurgan archaeological culture. The second major haplogroup is haplogroup F (21.3%), which is a combination of the lineages differing by the time of appearance. Haplogroup P found with the frequency of 9.6%, represents the genetic contribution of the population originating from the ancient autochthonous population of Europe. Haplogroups J and E (11.7 and 4.2%, respectively) mark the migration patterns of the Middle-Eastern agriculturists during the Neolithic. The presence of the N3 lineage (9.6%) is likely explained by a contribution of the assimilated Finno–Ugric tribes. The data on the composition and frequencies of Y-chromosome haplogroups in the sample studied substantially supplement the existing picture of the male lineage distribution in the Eastern Slav population.

Peoples: - | Places: - | Topics: - | DNA Type: Y-DNA

2005-01-01T00:00:00+00:00 January 1st, 2005|