//Molecular Biology and Evolution

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Molecular Biology and Evolution

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Articles of Interest

Evaluating the Neolithic Expansion at Both Shores of the Mediterranean Sea

Journal: Molecular Biology and Evolution | Year: 2017

Abstract:

During the Neolithic, human populations underwent cultural and technological developments that led to an agricultural revolution. Although the population genetics and evolution of European Neolithic populations have been extensively studied, little is known regarding the Neolithic expansion in North Africa with respect to Europe. One could expect that the different environmental and geological conditions at both shores of the Mediterranean Sea could have led to contrasting expansions. In order to test this hypothesis, we compared the Neolithic expansion in Europe and North Africa accounting for possible migration between them through the Strait of Gibraltar. We analysed the entire X chromosome of 580 individuals from 20 populations spatially distributed along the North of Africa and Europe. Next, we applied approximate Bayesian computation based on extensive spatially explicit computer simulations to select among alternative scenarios of migration through the Strait of Gibraltar and to estimate population genetics parameters in both expansions. Our results suggest that, despite being more technologically advanced, Neolithic populations did not expand faster than Palaeolithic populations, which could be interpreted as a consequence of a more sedentary lifestyle. We detected reciprocal Neolithic migration between the Iberian Peninsula and North Africa through the Strait of Gibraltar. Counterintuitively, we found that the studied Neolithic expansions presented similar levels of carrying capacity and migration, and occurred at comparable speeds, suggesting a similar demic process of substitution of hunter-gatherer populations. Altogether, the Neolithic expansion through both Mediterranean shores was not so different, perhaps because these populations shared similar technical abilities and lifestyle patterns.

Peoples: | Places: | Topics: approximate Bayesian computation, Mediterranean Sea, Neolithic expansion, Strait of Gibraltar, and X chromosome | DNA Type: X-DNA

Philippine Mitochondrial DNA Diversity: A Populated Viaduct between Taiwan and Indonesia

Journal: Molecular Biology and Evolution | Year: 2010

Abstract:

Peoples: | Places: | Topics: | DNA Type: mtDNA

The Dazzling Array of Basal Branches in the mtDNA Macrohaplogroup M from India as Inferred from Complete Genomes

Journal: Molecular Biology and Evolution | Year: 2006

Abstract:

Peoples: | Places: | Topics: | DNA Type: mtDNA

Large-scale mitochondrial DNA analysis in Southeast Asia reveals evolutionary effects of cultural isolation in the multi-ethnic population of Myanmar

Journal: Molecular Biology and Evolution | Year: 2012

Abstract:

Peoples: | Places: | Topics: | DNA Type: mtDNA

Origin and Expansion of Haplogroup H, the Dominant Human Mitochondrial DNA Lineage in West Eurasia: The Near Eastern and Caucasian Perspective

Journal: Molecular Biology and Evolution | Year: 2007

Abstract:

Peoples: | Places: | Topics: | DNA Type: mtDNA

Deciphering Past Human Population Movements in Oceania: Provably Optimal Trees of 127 mtDNA Genomes

Journal: Molecular Biology and Evolution | Year: 2006

Abstract:

Peoples: | Places: | Topics: | DNA Type: mtDNA

No Evidence for an mtDNA Role in Sperm Motility: Data from Complete Sequencing of Asthenozoospermic Males

Journal: Molecular Biology and Evolution | Year: 2007

Abstract:

The first complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences (∼16,569 bp) in 20 patients with asthenozoospermia and a comparison with 23 new complete mtDNA sequences in teratoasthenozoospermic individuals, confirmed no sharing of specific polymorphisms or specific mitochondrial lineages between these individuals. This is strong evidence against the accepted claim of a major role played by mtDNA in male fertility, once supported by haplogroup association studies based on the screening of hypervariable region I. The hypothesis of maternally driven selection acting in male reproductive success must thus be treated with caution.

Peoples: | Places: | Topics: Asthenozoospermia | DNA Type: mtDNA

Tracing the Austronesian Footprint in Mainland Southeast Asia: A Perspective from Mitochondrial DNA

Journal: Molecular Biology and Evolution | Year: 2010

Abstract:

Peoples: | Places: | Topics: | DNA Type: mtDNA

Mitogenomic Diversity in Tatars from the Volga-Ural Region of Russia

Journal: Molecular Biology and Evolution | Year: 2010

Abstract:

Peoples: Tatars | Places: | Topics: | DNA Type: mtDNA

Mitochondrial DNA Phylogeny in Eastern and Western Slavs

Journal: Molecular Biology and Evolution | Year: 2008

Abstract:

To resolve the phylogeny of certain mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups in eastern Europe and estimate their evolutionary age, a total of 73 samples representing mitochondrial haplogroups U4, HV*, and R1 were selected for complete mitochondrial genome sequencing from a collection of about 2,000 control region sequences sampled in eastern (Russians, Belorussians, and Ukrainians) and western (Poles, Czechs, and Slovaks) Slavs. On the basis of whole-genome resolution, we fully characterized a number of haplogroups (HV3, HV4, U4a1, U4a2, U4a3, U4b, U4c, U4d, and R1a) that were previously described only partially. Our findings demonstrate that haplogroups HV3, HV4, and U4a1 could be traced back to the pre-Neolithic times (∼12,000–19,000 years before present [YBP]) in eastern Europe. In addition, an ancient connection between the Caucasus/Europe and India has been revealed by analysis of haplogroup R1 diversity, with a split between the Indian and Caucasus/European R1a lineages occurring about 16,500 years ago. Meanwhile, some mtDNA subgroups detected in Slavs (such as U4a2a, U4a2*, HV3a, and R1a1) are definitely younger being dated between 6,400 and 8,200 YBP. However, robust age estimations appear to be problematic due to the high ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions found in young mtDNA subclusters.

Peoples: Belorussians, Czechs, Eastern Slavs, Poles, Russians, Slovaks, Ukrainians, and Western Slavs | Places: Eastern Europe | Topics: | DNA Type: mtDNA

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